Blogs updates.

The published pages on this blogs are not static. Aside from publishing new post pages, existing posts of this blog are periodically updated with photos of new species, additional photos of existing species and additional information. All materials published here are the property of the author. Reproduction of any material published here in part or in total without the expressed permission of this author is strictly forbidden.



Monday, December 12, 2011

Solenopsis Molesta The Thief Ant.

Of the Solenopsis genus Solenopsis molesta is one of the smallest at 2 mm long. Like many small ants including some species of Monomorium and of course one of the tiniest of ants Oligomyrmex, these ants are considered by many experts to be thief ants even as they are not any more "thiefing" than any other ants. They got a bad rap just on account of their being so tiny. This is possibly not an accurate classified as Solenopsis molesta, but based on a paper by a local entomologist.

Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta

Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta

Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta

Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta

Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta

Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Queen and workers of Solenopsis molesta

Workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Workers of Solenopsis molesta

Workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Workers of Solenopsis molesta

Workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Workers of Solenopsis molesta

Workers of Solenopsis molesta.
Workers of Solenopsis molesta



Taxonomy:
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Hexapoda
Class: Insecta
Subclass: Pterygota
Infraclass: Neoptera
Order: Hymenoptera
Suborder: Apocrita
Infraorder: Aculeata
Superfamily: Vespoide
Family: Formicidae
Subfamily: Myrmicinae
Genus: Solenopsis
Species: molesta


© 2011 Quah. All rights reserved.

Thursday, December 01, 2011

Nasutitermes Sp.

This small red species of the Nasutitermitinae subfamily of nasute termite appears to be totally subterranean whereas the first species is known for their arboreal nest and tunnels on the trunks and branches of trees. The soldier caste of Nasutitermes longinasus is dimorphic. This species is also around twenty percent longer (body length of the soldiers from tip of “stringe” to tip of abdomen). The major soldier is 5 millimeters long.

The minor worker of this red Nasutitermes longinasus termite has a much smaller head.
The minor worker of this red Nasutitermes species has a much smaller head

A minor soldier and a major soldier of Nasutitermes longinasus.

A worker of  Nasutitermes longinasus with a minor and a major soldier.
worker of Nasutitermes sp4 with a minor and a major soldier

The major soldier of Nasutitermes longinasus with a worker.

Major soldiers of  Nasutitermes longinasus with a worker.

Major soldiers of Nasutitermes longinasus.
Major soldiers of Nasuitermes sp

Close up shot of the major soldier of this small red Nasutitermes longinasus with a worker.
major soldier of this small red Nasutitermes with a worker

Close up shot of the major soldier of this small red Nasutitermes longinasus with a worker.

Close up shot of the major soldier of this small red Nasutitermes longinasus with a worker.

Close up shot of the major soldier of this small red Nasutitermes longinasus with a worker.



Close up shot of the major and minor soldiers of  Nasutitermes longinasus.
major and minor soldiers of Nasutitermes



Taxonomy
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Subclass: Pterygota
Infraclass: Neoptera
Superorder: Dictyoptera
Order: Isoptera 7499
Suborder: Fontanella
Subdivision: Longiprocta
Superfamily: Termitiodae
Family - Termitidae 46569
Subfamily: Nasutitermitinae
Genera:
Aciculioiditermes - Aciculitermes - Afrosubulitermes - Agnathotermes - Ahmaditermes - Ampoulitermes - Angularitermes - Anhangatermes - Antillitermes - Araujotermes - Arcotermes - Armitermes - Atlantitermes - Australitermes - Baucaliotermes - Bulbitermes - Caetetermes - Cahuallitermes - Caribitermes - Ceylonitermellus - Ceylonitermes - Coarctotermes - Coatitermes - Coendutermes - Constrictotermes - Convexitermes - Cornitermes - Cortaritermes - Cucurbitermes - Curvitermes - Cyranotermes - Cyrilliotermes - Diversitermes - Diwaitermes - Eleanoritermes - Embiratermes - Emersonitermes - Ereymatermes - Eutermellus - Fulleritermes - Grallatotermes - Havilanditermes - Hirtitermes - Hospitalitermes - Ibitermes - Kaudernitermes - Labiotermes - Lacessititermes - Leptomyxotermes - Leucopsitermes - Longipeditermes - Macrosubulitermes - Macuxitermes - Malagasitermes - Malaysiotermes - Mimeutermes - Mironasutitermes - Mycterotermes - Nasopilotermes - Nasutitermes - Nuiginitermes - Obtusitermes - Occasitermes - Occultitermes - Oriensubulitermes - Paracornitermes - Parvitermes - Periaciculitermes - Peribulbitermes - Postsubulitermes - Proaciculitermes - Procornitermes - Rhadinotermes - Rhynchotermes - Roonwalitermes - Rotunditermes - Sinonasutitermes - Spatulitermes - Subulitermes - Syntermes - Tarditermes - Tenuirostritermes - Thailanditermes - Triangularitermes - Trinervitermes - Tumulitermes - Velocitermes - Verrucositermes - Xiaitermes



Last Updated (YMD): 2014 09 10
First Posted: 2011 12 01
© 2011 Quah. All rights reserved.

Monday, November 21, 2011

Strumigenys The Miniature Trapjaw Ants

Strumigenys are very small trapjaw ants. These are mostly monomorphic with a single worker caste. Strumigenys are generally slow moving, some so slow that they appeared to be moving in slow motion. Many species of Strumigenys are specialist hunters of springtails even as they also scavenge food and hunt other tiny prey.

It many appear to be puzzling how such a slow moving ant is able to snare a fast moving springtail. Springtail are generally a nuisance pest to many ants (and also termites) infilterating their nests and the corridors of ant tunnels stealing bites of food that ants bring home being too alert to be caught by many ants staying just outside of their reach. The answer of course lies in the trapjaws triggered by fine hairs once a target is within striking distance.

Even among the trapjaw ants Anochetus, springtails is one of their regular food sources. While Anochetus and even Odontomachus (aside other arthropods) may stalk and hunt stringtails, Strumigenys is probably the greatest predator of springtails. In areas where springtails abound the density of Strumigenys nests also abound. Their hunting strategy is simply to go where springtails are found. This is usually where there are left over food scraps, such as in the dumping areas of ants nests and even under the bark of fallen tree trunks. The Stumigenys worker then just stay still until a springtail venture within the grasp of the trapjaw.

Sp1.
A worker of a very slow moving Strumigenys species.
A worker of a very slow moving Strumigenys species

Workers of strumigenys.
Workers of a very slow moving strumigenys
Sp2.


This species of Strumigenys at 2 millimiters is the smallest among the species documented on this page. It is also relatively faster moving with a more regular shape head. Picture below is of a queen with a worker of Strumigenys among the brood of eggs, larvae and pupae.
A slimmer Strumigenys species showing the queen and brood

Close-up of the queen or gyne of a Strumigenys species.
Close-up of the queen or gyne of a Strumigenys specie

The queen of a Strumigenys species.





Strumigenys Sp3.


Workers of Strumigenys sp. This species resembles the previous species above quite closely but is slightly larger with a proportionately larger head.



Strumigenys sp4.

The queen (in front) and a worker of Strumigenys sp4. Strumigenys the minature trapjaw ants. Photo below shows a worker and queen (in front). Most Strumigenys are small between to 2 to 3.5 millimeters. This species is polygynous and monomorphic.


Close up view of a worker of Strumigenys sp.


Strumigenys sp6




Strumigenys sp5







Taxonomy:
Kingdom - Animalia
Phylum - Arthropoda
Subphylum - Hexapoda
Class - Insecta
Subclass - Pterygota
Infraclass - Neoptera
Order - Hymenoptera
Suborder - Apocrita
Infraorder - Aculeata
Superfamily - Vespoidea
Family - Formicidae -- ants, fourmis
Subfamily - Myrmicinae
Genus - Strumigenys


Last Updated: 2014 06 20
First Posted: 2011 11 21
© 2011 - 2014 Quah. All rights reserved.

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Tropical Rainforest The Fungi, Moss And Lichen

Fungi are an essential component of the rainforest ecosystem, just as important to the rainforest as the invertebrates.


Fungi
































































































































 






















































































































































































































Cup fungi (mushroom.)


















 

Cupcake mushroom






























































 























Anemone mushroom











Coral mushroom






























Seastar (birdnest) mushroom

Seastar mushroom

Seastar mushroom





























































Hair fungi, note the spores around it on the fallen tree trunk.


















Moss
 Hair moss


 Moss

 Moss


Moss

Moss

 Moss

Hair moss

Moss


 
 Moss


 Moss

Moss (a variant of the one above)

Moss (two species with lichen left and bottom)



Moss

Moss (a larger version of the one above)

Moss

Moss

 Moss

Moss

Moss

 Moss

Moss

Moss

Moss (a larger variant of the one above)

Moss



 Moss

Moss

 Moss

Moss

 



Lichen
Lichen

Lichen

Lichen

Lichen

Lichen

Lichen

Lichen

Lichen

 Lichen

Lichen


Lichen

Lichen

Lichen

Lichen
Lichen

Lichen

Lichen

 Lichen

Lichen

 Black Lichen
 Black lichen
Black Lichen




See also:
The Tropical Rainforest
Tropical Rainforest The Aquatic Creatures
Tropical Rainforest The Fauna
Tropical Rainforest The Flora


Last Updated: 2017 03 28
First Posted: 2012 12 19
© 2011 – 2017 Quah. All rights reserved.